Project Activities

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The immersive 2x5 week project will run throughout two summer semesters running weekly workshops in the first semester (Tuesday 18th April- Friday 26th May) and biweekly workshops during the second semester (Monday 5th June- Friday 21st July). The programme will comprise of two types of Islamic art forms, namely Calligraphy and Marbling.

 

What is Marbling?

Marbling (Ebru) is a traditional Turkish art which produces patterns similar to smooth marble and other kinds of stone on to paper by spreading paints that do not dissolve in water with specific brushes on dense water that is thickened by a type of gum called tragacanth.

It isn't known exactly when or where the art of marbling started but the early examples are from the 16th century in the Ottoman-Turkish era and spread from the East to the West. Like all the classical Ottoman arts, the art of marbling was one which was not taught by writing or explanation, but rather was a branch of art in which students were trained by means of the "master/apprentice" system.

The basic technique which, throughout all its historical variations, has never changed. The process is always the same: paints are made to float on the surface of water where they are manipulated into designs and then transferred to a sheet of paper. In order to make this happen, the artist must learn to control the behaviour of the paint. 

 

What is Calligraphy? 

Calligraphy is more than ‘beautiful handwriting’ or ‘ornate lettering techniques.’

Calligraphy is the art of forming beautiful symbols by hand and arranging them well. It’s a set of skills and techniques for positioning and inscribing words so they show integrity, harmony, some sort of ancestry, rhythm and creative fire.

In the Middle East and East Asia, calligraphy by long and exacting tradition is considered a major art, equal to sculpture or painting. Calligraphy is a visual art related to writing. It is the design and execution of lettering with a broad tip instrument, brush, among other writing instruments. A contemporary calligraphic practice can be defined as, "the art of giving form to signs in an expressive, harmonious, and skillful manner". 

Forthcoming Events

Sep
30

Count Art: Early Intervention with Art

With calligraphy and marbling we aim to attract young people in Tower Hamlets to motivate them to achieve goals in their lives and to be more engaged within the community.


Latest News

A Tide of Humanity: Discussing the Migrant Crisis

On 27 November 2015, LCSS has successfully organised a roundtable at SOAS to discuss the recent Migrant Crisis


LCSS Training Programme on Ottoman and Archival Studies, London, 3rd-7th August 2015

In August 2015, LCSS has successfully conducted the Training Programme on Ottoman and Archival Studies, which took place in London and Oxford.


LCSS Summer School 2015

We are excited to conduct LCSS's first summer school and to host a lovely group of students from Azerbaijan. 20 July - 14 August


International Conference on Gender and Education: Critical Issues, Policy and Practice: Re-Gendering Education

LCSS’s growing gender platform continued its international conference series in Bloomington, IN, United States on International Conference on Gender and Education


Blog

“Insider” and/or “outsider: Anthropologists’ constant status negotiation”

Feray J. Baskin - PhD Candidate, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA


In the Name of the Nation: the burqa ban, French values and Islam

Daniela Alaattinoğlu - PhD Candidate, European University Institute - Florence, Italy


On Welfare Reform with Baroness Molly Meacher

Interview by Ozdemir Ahmet - On Thursday 4 April 2013 An interview was conducted with Baroness Molly Meacher at the House of Lords where questions were put out to her with regards to the welfare reforms introduced by the coalition.


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